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The Normative Defense of Free Market Capitalism:
Did the Free Market Cause the Financial Fiasco?

Author(s): TIBOR R. MACHAN (Chapman University)
Publisher: Addleton Academic Publishers, New York
ISBN: 978-1-935494-19-5
LCCN: 2011902492
Year: 2011
Pages: 126

Abstract:

Machan’s book advances an indispensable normative case for the free market
system of economy. He addresses the different approaches taken to showing
the superiority of the system to others and also discusses the charge that the
recent financial fiasco was caused by “market fundamentalism,” as the likes of
Paul Krugman keep claiming. This is a vital entry into the on-going debate
about whether the economic system based on the principles of freedom of
economic conduct, free exchange, private property rights, etc., is better than one
regimented from the top, either by some czar or a democratic assembly. Anyone
who is concerned with both the productivity and decency of an economic
system needs to address Machan’s arguments.

The Normative Defense of Free Market Capitalism:
Did the Free Market Cause the Financial Fiasco?
is indexed in: Law

EQUALITY, SO BADLY MISUNDERSTOOD

Author(s): TIBOR R. MACHAN (Chapman University)
Publisher: Addleton Academic Publishers, New York
ISBN: 978-1-935494-14-0
LCCN: 2010915193
Year: 2010
Pages: 108

Abstract:

The effort to make people equal in various important respects, e.g., wealth, health, education, burdens and advantages of all kinds, is the focus of criticism in this short work. I hold and argue that this effort is misguided, often very harmful and also frequently insidious, a guise for mischief by those who embark on the pursuit. The only valid form of equality pertains to people’s basic human individual rights—all who aren’t crucially incapacitated have these, so they are often called the equal rights of all persons. As regards politics and law this implies that no adult may be treated with special favor or disfavor by the legal authorities, whether in court or via public policy. Since the job of politics is to protect the equal rights of human individuals, everyone is equal under the law. But that’s the end of it, politically. Fairness is not a political good but one that has a role in various social contexts, such as family, teams, clubs, sport, beauty contests, and so forth. And fairness comes into play, other than in these areas, only when people voluntarily join some organization where they expect to be treated as all others who belong. Why so much fuss about equality and fairness? Some of the reasons have to do with the history of politics wherein kings and other rulers were expected to treat their subjects similarly, without favor to some of them and disfavor to others. And there is the tendency to extrapolate from family life, where parents are supposed to be fair to their children. Also, when teachers grade members of their classes, there is an implicit or explicit promise to do so unbiased, without special treatment of any (other than where justified, as when a student suffers from some impediment). But none of these imply or support the policies of egalitarianism. These and related topics comprise the content of this short volume and all egalitarians are invited to reflect on what is discussed here. In the tradition of classical political philosophy, this is not a technical, jargon-laden work, so any citizens can read it and gain food for thought.

This book is indexed and abstracted in the following international databases: Academic Papers Database, Contemporary Research Index, Current Index to Scholarly Journals, Digital Journals Database, Directory of Academic Resources, Elite Scientific Journals Archive, Recent Science Index, Scholarly Journals Index, Scientific Publications Index, and Scientific Resources Database.

EQUALITY, SO BADLY MISUNDERSTOOD is indexed in: Law